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Posts Tagged ‘Hilary Lorenz’

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After months of training the weekend finally arrived that I will run my first 50 mile race on Saturday November 23rd. I had three great months of running in New Mexico with the Santa Fe Striders over the summer, nice trails, great mountains, heat and altitude all rolled into one. I have been in NYC for the past three months, putting in plenty of 20 miles runs, a few 25′s and a 30, tonight I just had a handful of 400m intervals, but almost all on pavement.   The picture above is from the Blue Line Run done a couple weeks before the  NYC marathon and along the same course.

I signed up for the the JFK50 back in April through the urging of my friends Zander and Richard, at least that is how I remembered it, and together we will run it. Zander has run loads of 50s and both Zander and Richard have run over 100 marathons each! Despite their vastly superior experience I think we will be a good match physiologically to run this whole thing together.

I called on many ultra runner experienced friends, Joe, Michelle, Gabrielle,  Hideki, Tim and in the final 8 weeks Coach Owen Anderson. I had used Coach Anderson’s 30 days to a marathon finish plan for both a marathon and a half and PR’d both like crazy so I thought he could be me to the starting line fit and quick footed. Joe, Michelle, Gabrielle, Hideki and Tim provided me with a huge amount of information on eating and their GPS data, this was really crucial. I am not afraid to cover 50 miles, my only concern is making myself eat which is a constant problem. My pack is filled with dates, figs, bars and a couple emergency gels. But the best weapon I have in my back of tricks is my new beard hat!

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This awesome baby was hand crochet by my student Ruth. Yes it is warm, but it also makes me feel all fuzzy and happy inside and that happiness is what is going to carry me across the finish line with a smile!

Top 10 men last year came in between 5:34 and 6:12 and top 10 women 6:12 to 7:32. Many of these are professional sponsored athletes. People have up to 12 hours to complete the race which begins on the
Appalachian Trail and runs for 14 miles, then a gravel/dirt tow path for just over 26 and finally a road. The trail is technical and rocky and of course be slower, but I think they is a good way to start. I want to finish until 10 hours but honestly I have no clue what to expect, I just ran a 1:34 half marathon on September at altitude, but it was also a lot of downhill and on road. So here is to new adventures. Wish me luck!

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My hike for this week was in Taos. I met my ABQ friend Tom in Espanola at 7:00am for the drive up to the Ski Basin. We began at the Gavilan trail #60, it is about 1.5 miles before the ski basin, it is short, only 2.43 miles, but you gain 2,000 ft in those 2 miles from 8,881 feet of elevation to 11,205 feet of elevation. From there we went to Columbine Trail over to Gold Hill, wandered around on top the mountains before coming back down over the Long Trail. My last hike with Tom was a fast 20 milers, this one I am not sure how long it was, but we walked for 8 solid hours which equals about 16 to 17 miles.

After coming back to Abiquiu we ate at the famous El Farolitos in El Rito. I ran into four other friends  and we decided to take a night hike in Plaza Blanca, the Badlands of New Mexico. Walking around Plaza Blanca with only the moonlight was really cool. We took no lights  and wandered around  until about 11:00pm.

The next day I went to Santa Fe to meet up with the running group. I ran on my own Saturday morning extra early because I was helping time a race in town. It was pretty awesome, 217 people showed up, it was free with lots of great prizes. It made me want to race. I met my friend Joan who is in from NYC and we spend the days at galleries.

This morning the gang was running up Santa Fe Baldy, (12,622 ft) a 14 mile out and back run beginning at the Ski Basin. I hiked this last weekend. When I woke up Sunday morning, I felt kind of sad for no particular reason. But perhaps because I only have 26 days left, or because I hardly saw my dogs yesterday or maybe because I really just wanted to do laundry, I did not go. I took the dogs to the park at 6am until 7:30 met a really nice woman there and made a plans for her to bring her dog up to Abiquiu Lake, so it was a nice morning.

Now I feel sad that I missed the run, I just want to do everything. I love being outside and while I miss NYC, I will miss the mountains even more.

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Today I went to the Hospital for Special Surgery’s performance Lab and met Exercise Physiologist/RN Polly De Mille. I had pressing questions about training and I want to try out a theory of metabolic efficiency as written about by Bob Seebohar. You can look him up if you are interested.

My first question. How can I spend 14 weeks running just 4 days a week, low mileage, one hill workout, one theshold, a mid-length run (14-16) and run “X” at the Brooklyn Marathon, then the next year run, under the guidance of a coach, run 7 days a week, at least one 18 miler and one 15 per week-fast, two track workouts, two general workouts, a basic total kick ass almost kill me plan, and run the exact same race down to the second? Does that mean that is it for me, I will not get faster?

Question two: Why is it that I am running 6 days a week, have good track workouts, excellent strength workouts, okay mid length runs 12 miles or so and so unfit. Really I feel unfit.

I will give the brief version of my testing today and the longer version when I get the full results. I was going in for first metabolic testing to find at what paces I am most efficient at fat burning rather than carbohydrate burning, because if I can make myself more efficient I will be able to run faster long. This is a submax test of slow incremental speed changes and longish running time. Then I would try to take it to my max if possible all the while getting my blood lactate measured. Also what I did not know was they were counting my cadence so I will get a report of any “stride efficiency leaks.”

After a 4 hour fast and with massive headgear in place and a big rubber tube attached to my mouth I started the warm-up, walking for 10 minutes while gathering data. After the 10:00 warm up, the Woodward Treadmills set at 1% include when from paces, 9:52, 9:17, 8:45, 8:18, 7:53, 7:30, 7:10, 6:51. At about 7:30 my right quad started aching, and sweat started forming. At 7:10 I could not believe how awful this felt telling myself the whole time, “this is shower than your 5k pace” then two and a half  minutes into the 6:51 I put up my finger to stop, that was enough of this madness. But Polly was  telling me to push, push, push, one more minute, keep going. There was a second I thought I would puke into the giant rubber mouth gag. When I decided I wanted to stop, suddenly the headgear felt terrible and I wanted it out. I made it to the end of the stage, my blood lactate at 10.3, overcooked basically. It seems sad to have to stop at this slow of a pace. I thought I would make it to 6:00 since they were only 4 minutes long, but I wanted out of there.  Here is the most basic I what I learned.

My blood lactate started rising more quickly around 8:18 pace, if I remember correctly, so that needs to raise. But why would it not clear better and why did it raise here? This is the ultimate find. I need to make more mitochondria and aerobic enzymes. With more mitochondria and aerobic enzymes I will burn fat more efficiently, I will be able to run faster longer and that mitochondria will gobble up and use the lactate rather than send it haywire all over. More simply? In training I need to run slower, longer, oh and cut out grains and high carbohydrate foods.  According to my current Vo2Max, I should be able to run a 3:17 marathon, a 1:34 half. My best marathon is 3:43, best half 1:43, that is a big difference. But it also goes to show I am not aerobically fit as the marathon is almost 100% aerobic.

This is very exciting news and my optimism is quite high. There is one more reason I wanted these number, to train for running a 50 miler race in October and in July the Grand Canyon R2R2R!

So what this said as I understand it at the moment is that if I work primarily on my aerobic endurance and efficiency, I have room to get way better, which is way cool.
The HSS performance lab will be sending my mult-page report at the end of the week. I will let you know more about it.

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STONETRIGGER PRESS with Hilary Lorenz
Work Exchange Summer Printing Residency

You want a vacation, you want to make prints but have limited funds. Maybe you want to make art in a beautiful place and help develop a new printshop and residency program. Whatever your reasons, here is the deal:

I built a gorgeous 26′ x 25′ adode and stone printmaking studio in Abiquiu, New Mexico, Georgia O’Keefe country and I need help. The tables are built, the two Charles Brand etching presses are in place, but the finishing touches such as an aquatint box, an organizational system, plus fencing, and landscaping on the 2 acres need to happen. I am offering a work exchange, free shared housing and full use of the studio for your help.  An average workday is four hours, the rest is yours to make art, run, hike, swim, bike, explore, you name it. Location is very rural, 50 miles NW from Santa Fe. Wi-Fi, phone, water and electric in house. Studio is passive solar, no water yet. I invite all motivated, curious, handwork printmakers who also have great ideas to come. Length of time flexible, 3 days to 3 weeks, number of people flexible, dogs flexible.  June through August could be extended. Curious? Email for more info: hilary@hilarylorenz.com

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Last Fall’s Marathon?!

ImageAs a blogger I am a slacker, so a quick catch up for my Nov 18th post. After the NYC marathon was cancelled I got invited to run the Brooklyn Marathon, a 9 loop course in Prospect Park in Brooklyn, NY.

I had not idea how it would go. I ran a 10 mile race in this park and it about killed me. There is one long one mile uphill, but of course that leads to a downhill on the other side. Briefly the loop course is my friend. I loved the loop course. I met up with my buddy Amy Copper and we decided to run together. It was a blast. The loops went by in no time and suddenly I was looking at the last six miles when my usual training buddies David and Patrick showed up. I quickly sided up to their fresh legs and focused in to the finish. At one point David asked if I wanted to know how fast I was going, and I simply replied “no” just keep going.

I crossed the line at 3:43. I won my age group  by over 18:00 and came in 27th overall woman out of 175. There were a total of 444 people in the race. I was in the top 25% male and female. I am pretty happy about it. Winter I have taken a break but I am now slowly gearing it back up.

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In 2011 I was schedule to run the NYC Marathon but I burned myself out running in New Mexico. I was new to the altitude and hot sun. I just could not get myself together in time to run in November so I postponed to 2012.  This year 2012 I was on a good track. I ran smartly over the summer in New Mexico, I was ready to finish off the next 10 weeks of training in NYC. Well of course you all know the NYC Marathon was cancelled.

I am avoiding all the political fighting about it but I will say I have very mixed feelings. I hoped it cancelled only for personal reasons. I had been sitting in the dark and cold for a week. I was one of the many of 1,000 of people in SoPo. (South of the power grid in NYC) I was highly stressed and I could not imagine pulling off running a marathon.  On the day it was to take place 1,000′s of runners showed up in Central Park to run 26.2 anyway. I planned on only 20, but quit at 18. My knee which never hurts, hurt. My whole body ached. I woke up the net day feeling like I was hit by a truck. I felt terrible.

The night before that run I got a call from Megan Coryat, President of Front Runners New York. She was calling with great news. The Brooklyn Marathon organizers was offered two competitive slots, one male, one female to NYC teams for the Nov. 18th event and they offered me the female slot. I was thrilled, honored, and suddenly terrified because I felt like I need to produce.The course is brutal. It just might be the hardest thing I ever run. The whole marathon takes place in a 3 mile park with steep 1 mile long hill. It is lap after lap of that mile hill. I know my legs will be screaming. I have run 10 miles in that park and it was hard!

The problem now is I have a terrible cold. I had terrible burning in my lungs last week after a run then as of Sunday I felt pretty bad. I came home from work Monday and took a nap then ran an easy 3.62 miles. The running felt r good, but as soon as I stopped I was coughing up a lung.  If could get this crap out of my lungs I might be okay, but so far nothing is moving. Today I did not run. I got acupuncture, herbs and cold pills. I took a hot bath  to take the chills off, ate hot soup, and I am now drinking hot tea. I have 5 days. But I do  need to run 3-4 miles on each of those days. I am keeping my fingers crossed, but I am feeling like I should give up Fall Marathons. Run a spring marathon and focus on short distance in the fall. My last two marathons seasons are really a bust. I am going to hold out all the way until 8am on Sunday and hope that I show up at the start line. I will show up on the start line.

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November 1, 2012

The first day out of the Lower East Side, out of the cold, out of the darkness and in an area of phone reception and Internet. Ah yes, my office at Long Island University in downtown Brooklyn. I have never been so happy to get here, but it was not without incident.

Good news is the NYC Marathon is on and I am rested and happy to run to on Sunday.  I slept more in the last few days since the Con Edison 14th Street plant blew up leaving us in the dark; it is just 14 blocks from my apartment.

A video of the plant blowing up from the other side of the river in Brooklyn:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYC7sV1Kj9o .
as was this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gtNgauQlIE .

In Manhattan from 34th Street down to Battery Park City, east to west there is no electricity which means no hot water, and in some buildings no water at all,  no internet, no charging cell phone, but most cell phones do not work  anyway since many of  the towers went down. We are in a media blackout and as well as a dark city.

Honestly losing the lights and heat unto itself is not a big deal it is like camping, but last night I wanted a shower and I had enough. I tried to get out of Manhattan and it was impossible. Cars are allowed into the city and it is jammed bumper to bumper and people are being extra assholes. None of the street lights work and there are almost no traffic cops so the cars speed down long stretches not slowing, let alone stopping at the cross streets for other cars or pedestrians. A friend who had to drive to work, said it took three hours to go less than 3 miles. Because he is handicapped he could not walk. Plus there is no gas. The gas stations cannot work without electricity and where there is electric they ran out of gas, so we really are trapped.  I can ride my bike or run but I can’t bring my dogs with me, so I am staying.

Then there is the problem of  people feeling the need to buy huge amounts of crap in Brooklyn where services are working. As I rode my bike onto the Manhattan Bridge  (to come to LIU) a guy with what looked like a whole fucking kitchen table strapped to his back came flying down the bridge ran into my lane and hit me with the giant object, throwing me and my bike into the guard rail. It slammed my arm into the metal in one direction my hand in the other. After holding up to the stress this week I felt the tears come, then figured it would feel really good to cry, but just as I started to cry and pry my arm out of the fence, the next person riding down says, “that is a really bad place to stop.” No kidding, but can I at least get my arm back and make sure my hand is not broke?”  and that piece of dog crap that hit me kept going. “Oh, do I found stressed out?” Yes, a little bit. I have some anger going. As most of you know I am an easygoing person but I could have  pummeled that guy with his stupid table.

One of the coffee shops opened today. They must have brought the coffee brought in,  the place was lit with candles.  It was nice to have hot coffee. My refrigerator is completely empty having to throw everything out. Last night  7 of my neighbors came over;  we drank wine, had delicious lasagna, rice pudding, streamed vegetables, basically we emptied what was still good in our houses and cooked it on my gas stove. The night before I went to David’s and 4 of us made pizzas and ate leftovers in the dark. But from here on out it will be rice, oatmeal or other no-perishables. (Now if only a grocery store was open.) I am really happy that I have water. The 16 story buildings just three blocks away, buildings that are massive, have no water at all.

The dark neighborhood  of course is the perfect opportunity for crime. With no ATM’s working, people are carrying around more cash than they normally would, and the number of armed muggings has taken off. I was surprised to see  cops walking my street on Tuesday night when I came home about 10:30pm in pitch-blackness trying not to step on the plethora of rats that are no about.  There are more and more police present.

That is the update from the Lower East Side. I am off to find some dog food and something really tasty for myself. Tonight David, Patrick and I are going to the Marathon Expo to pick up our numbers. I may still try to get out of Manhattan, I would love a nice long hot bath and a good rest.  I am going to have to skip my special marathon haircut since no salon is open. It is hard telling how long it will be before we have electric. I have heard anything from 4 days to 2 weeks. I can’t say when I will be back on-line, but I am doing fine. I have great friends in the neighborhood and want to be with them.

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Looking Good! Oh NO!

A few weeks ago I got two compliments in the same week that “I looked good.” My first thought was, “oh, crap I am getting fat.”

Imagine my delight (reinforcing my belief that I do NOT  body dysmorphic disorder) when I read this in the 1977 Complete Book of Running chapter on “Getting Thin:

“A runner in good condition weighs not more than two pounds per inch of height. A man not more than 5-10 percent body fat; a woman is about 15 to 20 percent. ….Ted Corbitt, the former Olympic marathoner mentions in Chapter 2, “When people tell you how good you look, you can be sure you are not fit. If you don’t look gaunt you’re out of shape.” Dr. Alan Clark, the same physician cited in Chapter 2 as an advocate of aerobic exercise instead of tranquilizers, told me that after six months on a running program “friends would approach my wife in private and speak with a concerned air about my gaunt appearance and ask how long I had been ill. Her explanation-that I was long-distance runner-would leave them scratching their heads.”

James E. Fixx, The Complete Book of Running, pg. 75, 1977

In the next week I am asked if I am ill, or told that I looked gaunt I will know I am ready for the marathon! If not, I will just wing it and run as hard as I can. Surely at the finish I will look ill.

 

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The pleasure that conceals itself in pain is familiar to most runners. At the finish of the 1975 Boston Marathon a spectator named Kitty Davis noticed a runner crying. His face was contorted like a child’s and tears were running down his weather-tanned cheeks.

“Why are you crying, sir?” Mrs. Davis asked. “Are you hurt?”

“No,” the runner replied, “I’m crying because I am so happy.”

Perhaps, then there is in us a need to experience pain, and through it pleasure.

James E. FIxx “The Compete Book of Running” ©1977

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ING NYC Marathon

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Twelve more days until the NYC Marathon. And in celebration I am going to post daily quotes from the 1977 “Complete Book of Running by James E. Fixx. The first book I owned as a Junior High School beginning miler. Reading it today is a refreshing and simple look back into the uncomplicated days of running.

“Of course runners feel better; become thinner; probably live longer; have a better sex life, and drink and smoke less than their sedentary companions, but they are also likely to acquire a “high” from running, increased their self-esteem, be better able to cope with pressure and tension, feel surges of joy, discover that apparently insoluble problems dissolve, and even achieve, however temporary, a state of serenity that carries over into their daily lives.”

Thank you Jim Fixx.

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